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Pollution in Tunisia and how can we solve it?

Pollution is a worldwide catastrophe that is wreaking various countries, and Tunisia is no exception. From land to water and air pollution, people are struggling to find solutions to this calamity.

Located along the Meditteranean sea, Tunisia is famous for its fabulous beaches. However, people have turned this paradise into hell. First of all, a lot of factories release their waste into the sea. Therefore, multiple places such as Sidi Mansour in Sfax became impossible to swim in, and marine life became endangered, which resulted in poisonous food and lack of fish and seafood.

Moreover, people often leave the beaches dirty without getting rid of their trash. Consequently, plastic garbage is released into the sea, and sea turtles consume it thinking of it as medusas. Unfortunately, deadly jellyfish have started appearing in the sea, just like what happened recently in Mahdia, which terrified people and prevented them from swimming.

 

In addition to that, people’s lack of awareness has also led to land pollution. The municipalities cannot afford enough trash cans. Hence, citizens throw their garbage randomly in the streets, knowing that the cleaners will take a long time to come and get rid of it. Sadly, this causes horrible smells, rats and insects invasions, and illnesses.

However, air pollution is considered the most detrimental pollution type that is affecting Tunisia. Indeed, most big cities are suffocating with jams and factories such as SIAP in Sfax and Gabes. They release toxic gases, which badly affect health and frequently lung cancer. Despite the enormous pressure of activists, this mortal factory is still open in Gabes, endangering numerous lives.

 

When defeating such a problem, several solutions have been suggested. Sadly, neither the authorities nor the citizens took them seriously. As one of the new generation that aims to make a change, Fatma Rekik, a 17-year-old high school student and a First Skills Club coach, expresses her opinion regarding this topic: “If we are thinking long term, we need to establish the adequate infrastructure for eco-friendly solutions or systems.

When defeating such a problem, several solutions have been suggested. Sadly, neither the authorities nor the citizens took them seriously. As one of the new generation that aims to make a change, Fatma Rekik, a 17-year-old high school student and a First Skills Club coach, expresses her opinion regarding this topic: “If we are thinking long term, we need to establish the adequate infrastructure for eco-friendly solutions or systems.

Another solution is raising awareness about the benefits of using electric cars, especially among those who can afford them. The more people who use electric vehicles, the fewer lives risk catching sickness because of toxic gases. “We need to force the companies that contribute to polluting Tunisia to either reduce their carbon footprint or offset it through, for example, planting trees”, Fatma adds.

In conclusion, the root of the problem is the behavior of most Tunisian citizens. That is why changing them is the key to ending pollution. If everyone were responsible for their trash, the streets would be cleaner, and everyone would be healthier. If people join their hands, their efforts will change Tunisia for the better.

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